Ancient Chronology Critiques: Not Always PaleoBabble

I used to be really into ancient chronology (Near East, biblical). The chronology of the ancient Near East prior to 1000 BC and its basis has genuine uncertainties. Consequently, this is one area where alternative theorists have some real contributions to make. While I don’t buy a number of the proposed reconstructions, the notion that there’s nothing that merits new approaches and re-investigation is wishful thinking on the part of the academy.

In light of all that, I recommend the archive to ISIS, the journal of the ancient chronology forum. The contributors are all serious scholars with good credentials. I’ve read a number of the articles in this journal and there’s a lot of good stuff here that challenges consensus thinking with real data – not the hokum that so often comes with alternative research.

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Facade Sequel Title and Contest Winner

Congratulations to Brent Lynn, the first to successfully identify the title of the sequel to The Facade!  The good folks at Kirkdale are already at work getting Brent his copy of  The Façade: Special Edition, which features the first five chapters of the sequel.

The title of the sequel is The Portent. To those for whom that word may not be familiar, Websters defines it this way: “An indication of something important or calamitous about to occur; an omen.”

Yep.

Guess the Title of the Sequel to The Facade and Win

Yesterday I announced that a special edition of The Façade is being released. You can get it for 25% off from Vyrso. Along with some never-before-seen bonus content, the special edition includes the first five chapters of the sequel.

So what is the title of the sequel?

Use the hints below and post your guess in the comments section for a chance to win a free copy of The FaçadeSpecial Edition.

The sequel title has two words. The first is “the” so you’re half way there. For those who have access to the normal edition of the book as it’s been sold to this point,  the second word of the sequel title can be found somewhere in chapter 66. The word occurs only once in the chapter (its only occurrence in the entire book).

Be the first to guess correctly and you’ll win a free copy of The Façade: Special Edition from Kirkdale Press and Vyrso. Post your guess in the comments!

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Pre-Order the Special Edition of the Facade and Get a Sneak Peek at the Sequel

Today marks the release for pre-order of the special edition of my paranormal-supernatural thriller, The Façade. The novel includes some ancient astronaut threads, and the sequel will pick up them as well. The special edition published by Kirkdale Press contains some great bonus content:

  • Behind The Façade: A look into how and why I wrote The Façade.
  • Resources for Further Study: An annotated bibliographic guide to the government documents, covert military programs, religious ideas, and UFO controversies that are part of the plot of The Façade.
  • The first five chapters of the highly-anticipated sequel!

The special edition is freshly edited and formatted for your ereader, mobile phone, tablet, and computer. Click here for a synopsis. Readers get 25% off when they pre-order it on Vyrso.

I’ll be revealing a hint about the sequel’s title tomorrow on the blog. Be the first to guess correctly and you’ll get a free copy of The Façade: Special Edition.

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Alexander the Great and UFOs

Bet you never thought you’d see those two subjects in the same sentence! Welcome to the wacky world of ancient astronaut twaddle.

A reader recently sent me a link to this essay on the Chronicon Mirabilium blog: “Did Alexander the Great Really See UFOs?” It’s a good piece, as it injects some sanity into the paleobabbling and exposes another hole in the ancient astronaut “evidence” we’ve come to know and chuckle at.

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Simcha Jacobovici’s Conspiracy Fantasy

I recommend readers have a look at this recent post by Dr. Larry Hurtado. It begins this way:

If you want to see a good example of what be-devils any scholarly analysis of practically anything to do with Jesus and early Christianity, have a read of the postings of the Canadian TV self-promoter, Simcha Jacobovici here. . . . [Jacobovici] trashes all the scholars and queries as “sleeper agents of Christian orthodoxy”.

Sleeper agents of Christian orthodoxy? Really? What’s next from Jacobovici? Producing another spell-binding documentary promoting his own heroism against this vast conspiracy? Will we see Fabio play the lead?

It doesn’t get much more inconsequential and insipid than this.

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More Online Resources for Vaccination Against PaleoBabble

There’s been a spate of resources that have popped up online in recent days for excellent resources to study the ancient world. Some of these resources have been around a while, but have gotten some recent attention and traffic on various blogs and news sites. Here are some valuable links:

The New English Translation of the Septuagint (NETS) Online

  • this is the most recent scholarly translation of the Septuagint

The Gospel of Thomas Resource Center

  • Do your research on Thomas here, not with Dan Brown and Michael Baigent. That way something you say about Thomas has a prayer of being right.

The Ancient World Mapping Center

  • The Center promotes cartography, historical geography, and geographic information science as essential disciplines within the field of ancient studies through innovative and collaborative research, teaching, and community outreach activities.

Giza 3-D

  • For the first time, the latest and most exhaustive information available on the Giza Necropolis will be made available to everyone through a realistic experience that can satisfy mere cu- riosity or encourage more demanding research inquiries

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For Those Who Want to Study Akkadian

Readers who have poked around my book recommendations would know that I think Huehnergard’s A Grammar of Akkadian (3rd ed.; with its companion answer key, Key to a Grammar of Akkadian) is the best around. The Ancient World Online blog notes that the vocabulary for this grammar is available in online flashcards. Pretty cool.

Believers in Zecharia Sitchin’s “work” in Mesopotamian texts can ignore this.