Changes to My Home Page and PaleoBabble

Those of you who have gone to my homepage in the last day or two have already noticed the changes, but I need to make an official announcement.

For the past year a professional designer has taken my site on as a gratis project (Joseph Fioramonti of POSTMORTAL Design). He’s streamlined the site and blogs on the back end, put together some original art work, and made the blogs look like they belong to the homepage. I like the look and

What does this mean for readers? For now, you can still get to this blog (and the others) from the new homepage, or use the redirect I’ve had for several years: paleobabble.com. But there will be changed to that …

Over the next week:

  • I’ll be posting a note on my old homepage directing people to the new one
  • I’ll be populating all the posts on this blog to their new homes on the new blog site that lives within the new homepage. Most of that is already done, but I have a couple months of copying and pasting to do. That means that, right now, the new blog sites will NOT have the most recent posts (I think they have up through this past January).  I’ll announce something when the copying is done.
  • Once the copying is done, I will put a sign on the front of this blog (a “last post”) directing people to the new blog location.

Longer Term:

  • I will cease looking at or interacting with this old blog page.  I may just take it down after several months. Not sure. Same with the old homepage.

Have a look at the new site and its pages — especially the blogs. Let me know if something is missing, or you can’t find something. The layout is different, but we’ll all get used to it.

New Book Critiquing Jesus Mythicism

Another bad day for the Zeitgeist crowd.

Prof. Larry Hurtado (Emeritus, University of Edinburgh) alerted his blog readers to a new book by Prof. Maurice Casey (Emeritus, Nottingham University). The title is Jesus: Evidence and Argument or Mythicist Myths?

Hurtado writes:

It will be apparent from the title that Casey (along with practically every scholar who has considered the matter) doesn’t buy the “mythicist” case.  He is a long-time acquaintance and a well-published and noted scholar in NT.  Because identifying a person as a traditional Christian is sometime invoked (by self-styled “sceptics”) as an excuse to ignore whatever he/she says about Jesus or anything to do with Christian origins, I’ll also mention that this hardly applies to Casey.  He doesn’t argue with a view to trying to protect Christian belief or believers.  Whatever the strength of his arguments, he’s not doing apologetics!

 

From the publisher’s website:

Did Jesus exist? In recent years there has been a massive upsurge in public discussion of the view that Jesus did not exist. This view first found a voice in the 19th century, when Christian views were no longer taken for granted. Some way into the 20th century, this school of thought was largely thought to have been utterly refuted by the results of respectable critical scholarship (from both secular and religious scholars).

Now, many unprofessional scholars and bloggers (‘mythicists’), are gaining an increasingly large following for a view many think to be unsupportable. It is starting to influence the academy, more than that it is starting to influence the views of the public about a crucial historical figure. Maurice Casey, one of the most important Historical Jesus scholars of his generation takes the ‘mythicists’ to task in this landmark publication. Casey argues neither from a religious respective, nor from that of a committed atheist. Rather he seeks to provide a clear view of what can be said about Jesus, and of what can’t.

 

The Myth of the Smithsonian Archaeological Conspiracy

I’ve directed readers to Jason Colavito’s blog many times before, but I don’t believe I’ve included this specific essay: How David Childress Created the Myth of a Smithsonian Archaeological Conspiracy.

Jason makes a good case for the modern origin of this oft-repeated point of conspiracist dogma. I’m not claiming (and neither would Jason, I presume) that Childress is the explanation for every thread along these lines, but it seems pretty clear he’s a major fountainhead.