More Free Online Resources for Ancient Research

As is my custom, every once in a while I have to post something that veers away from exposing paleobabble toward real research. I’ve posted in the past about the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute and its posting of various volumes related to Assyriology. Here are some other goodies (courtesy of the Ancient World Online blog):

The Claremont Colleges Digital Library offers several open access resources relating to antiquity:

The Bulletin of the Institute for Antiquity and Christianity is published periodically under the auspices of the Society for Antiquity and Christianity for the general information of persons interested in the research programs of the Institute.
The Claremont Coptic Encyclopedia (CCE) will initially include approximately 2800 articles published in The Coptic Encyclopedia (Aziz S. Atiya, ed. NY: Macmillan, 1991).
The Nag Hammadi codices, thirteen ancient manuscripts containing over fifty religious and philosophical texts written in Coptic and hidden in an earthenware jar for 1,600 years, were accidentally discovered in upper Egypt in the year 1945.

Attalus

This site contains over 25,000 links to Greek and Latin authors online. The links include detailed lists of events and sources for the history of the Hellenistic world and the Roman republic. It includes links to online translations of many of the sources, as well as new translations of some works which have not previously been easily available in English.

New Scholarly E-Book Launch for Greek and Latin Literature

My employer, Logos Bible Software, announced a new brand today — Noet, the beginning of our effort to do for classical Greek and Latin literature what we did for biblical studies. You can read our CEO’s blog post about the launch to get introduced to what Noet’s all about. Here are some excerpts:

Noet (rhymes with “poet”) is the Logos platform repurposed for scholarly ebooks outside biblical studies: Greek and Latin classics, philosophy, literature, Shakespeare, Judaica, etc. We will reuse the key Logos platform components with Noet branding, from the online bookstore to desktop software to web viewers to mobile apps on iOS and Android.

But more excitingly, we’ll customize Logos 5’s tools to support the special needs of disciplines beyond biblical and theological studies: we’ll support powerful searching of philosophical themes, interlinear editions of classical texts, word-for-word comparisons of different editions of Shakespeare, and even specialized timelines and infographics.

Logos has offered a wide range of content for many years, and there’s a lot of content in other fields that our users find useful: Greek and Latin classical literature is important to serious biblical study and lexicography; philosophy is of interest to theologians and seminary students. We want to develop the tools that will support students of the Bible in these adjacent disciplines.

Learn more at Noet.com.