Inerrancy, Adam and ETS

| December 7, 2013

It’s been two weeks since I attended the annual meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society (held this year in Baltimore). The theme this year was inerrancy. I know it’s a tired subject for many, but it’s still quite current within ETS, due in no small part to recent books that force the question. I speak […]

Should the Septuagint be Considered Inspired?

| August 27, 2013

That’s the question proposed for consideration in a post by a friend of mine, Gabe Martini (“Is the Septuagint a Divinely Inspired Translation?“). Nothing like a provocative headline! I thought you Septuagint fans out there would like it. Gabe is Orthodox and so he’s ready to say “yes” in answer to his own question. The article is interesting […]

Why Should You Care About the Septuagint?

| July 22, 2013

Here’s one answer. The link leads to the Oxford University Press website and points to a new book on the LXX. But it also contains a good overview answer to the question that I’d recommend to readers. Here’s a related answer that I wrote for Bible and Spade in 2010. Technorati Tags: Christianity, early church, […]

History, Archaeology, and Faith

| February 15, 2013

The Bible Places Blog (BPB) draws our attention to a new book edited by James K. Hoffmeier and Dennis R. Magary entitled, Do Historical Matters Matter to Faith?: A Critical Appraisal of Modern and Postmodern Approaches to Scripture. It looks like a quality resource. It’s focus is on how biblical historicity matters for inspiration and […]

Interpreting Genesis 1: Who’s the Literalist Now?

| September 12, 2012

I appreciated this post from James McGrath, whose short essay was stimulated by Robin Parry’s post, to whom James directs his readers. The issue is how “literal creationists” are actually only selective literalists (or, as I would call them, “inconsistent literalists”). If one was truly consistent in interpreting the creation description in Genesis 1 at […]